BTRIPP (btripp) wrote,
BTRIPP
btripp

You really should read this one ...

I don't think that Wayne Allyn Root is the type of guy who gets embarrassed much, but I suspect he's somewhat so when it comes to this book. Root made his name in sports prognostication, and then turned to being a political commentator. Back in 2008, he was a hopeful for the Libertarian Party's Presidential candidacy, and was in third place with as much as 26.7% of the vote through five rounds of balloting at their national convention. The top two contenders, former GOP Congressman Bob Barr, and LP “true believer” Mary Ruwart, were locked in a virtual tie on each of these, and following the fifth ballot, Root reached out to Barr to offer his support, in exchange for a spot on the ticket. This was enough to give Barr the nomination, and landed Root in the VP slot. That was, of course, when everybody was expecting Hillary to roll to the White House, and the LP was seeing this as a great opportunity to get some exposure with a wider swath of the voting public. Of course, instead of the “abysmal” Hillary winning, it was the “horrific” current POTUS, which changed the game … the threat of the abuses of the current administration (which has been every bit as monstrous as anticipated, with even more anti-Americanism than anybody could have thought possible) made “standing on principle” a sucker bet.

Root wrote The Conscience of a Libertarian: Empowering the Citizen Revolution with God, Guns, Gold and Tax Cuts in 2009, when he was gearing up for a LP Presidential run in 2012. He was elected to the Libertarian National Committee in 2010 (and re-elected in 2012), and this book was very much the vehicle that he was using as a cornerstone of his campaign. However, as the first term of the current POTUS marched on in its disgusting Alinsky debasing of the country, it became obvious to Root that it was more important to try to get a new administration in place than to make a quixotic (if noble) run as a 3rd party candidate, and resigned from the LP in order to help with the Mitt Romney campaign.

Root was roundly savaged by the Libertarian “true believers” (sort of like food fetishists, but neurotically doctrinaire on political stances) for this … they felt he was a “carpet bagger” anyway from his previous run (and deal with “Libertarian of convenience” Barr), and having him jump back to the GOP was seen as a betrayal, at best.

Frankly, I feel that Root has gotten a bad rap in this … as his beliefs (certainly as set out in this book) are solidly Libertarian in the Goldwater sense of the term. Indeed, Conscience of a Libertarian is inspired by Barry Goldwater's 1960 Conscience of a Conservative (although three times as long as the earlier book), and he spends much of the first part of it dipping into the far-sighted wisdom of Mr. Goldwater.

I also have a somewhat unusual problem with this review – I have over two dozen bookmarks stuck in here for “good parts” that I wanted to share. Root and I have a very similar view of government – that it is the enemy most of the time, so there's a “preaching to the choir” aspect here. Things like:
… government entitlement and welfare programs have never been about helping the poor. They've always been about giving more power and control to politicians and government.
are such a relief to see expressed by somebody other than myself (when swearing at my computer monitor).

Again, Root was out-front with this being his call to action for a substantial 3rd party run as a potential LP Presidential candidate, and it's set up very much in that context. The book is in four parts, “A Revolution Is Brewing” which sets out the case that both major parties are leading the country down the drain with bigger and less responsible government, framed with material by Goldwater and the Founders; “Let's Talk Money and Politics” which looks, in horrifying detail, at just how bad things had gotten by 2009 (needless to say, they've gotten worse since); “Solutions for the Mess We Are In” which presents a fairly coherent plan for how to reverse much of the madness of not only the past couple of decades, but on back to the post-WW2 lurch into big government; and “Protecting and Preserving our Inalienable Civil Liberties”, which details all the areas where our Liberties are being ground out of existence by both major parties. It's really a shame that a GOP candidate hadn't won in '08 (aside from the obvious blessing it would have been to have avoided the disastrous Leftist rampage of the current execrable administration!), as it would have been a lot of fun to see Root running at the head of the LP ticket in 2012, trying to make the stuff in Conscience of a Libertarian come to be.

One of the key values of this book – and why I would recommend it to everybody – is that it gets into gory details on HOW BAD THINGS ARE … stuff that you'll never hear a peep about from the progressive-conspirator MSM. Living in Illinois, we're especially at the mercy of a kleptocratic state government that has for generations solidified its power with sweetheart deals for the unions – and especially the government employees unions – deals that are now totally bankrupting the state. Cynical politicians like Mike Madigan have been promising insanely high pension packages to the unions and leaving the taxpayers of the state on the hook for these billions of dollars. Root has a chapter in here, “Government Employee Unions Gone Wild” which outlines exactly how this scheme has played out, and he very kindly gave me permission to do a .pdf version of that chapter, which you can download HERE. If you're in Illinois, I urge you to download that, email it to friends, print it out (I formatted it so it will print front-and-back on four sheets of paper), and get the word out on this particularly vile situation.

As is often the case when I find myself with a “forest” of bookmarks in a book I'm reviewing, I can find myself being unsure exactly what it was on those pages that I was wanting to use (although enough of them were in the above-noted chapter that I decided to contact the author to simply bring that whole thing to you). One bit that I found illuminating, however, is in the “God and Government” chapter where Root (who grew up Jewish but converted to some evangelical Christian sect in order to marry his fundy wife, as I noted in my review of his Relentless book) discusses religious matters, he writes:
... my religious views should not allow me to use government as a hammer to smash those views down your throat. I want to explain to Christians who support all my fiscal views of smaller government, less government spending, lower entitlements, lower taxes, and more freedom, that asking for government to enforce our religious and moral values is in fact big government. And it's also a big mistake.
Given that I first came to the Libertarian Party because its “religion neutral” positioning (in the face of having Armageddon-desiring fundy Dan Quayle being “a heartbeat away from the Presidency” in Bush I's administration), I find Root's stance on belief reassuring.

One of Root's most dramatic propositions here comes in the “Eliminating Federal Taxes and the IRS” chapter … which, in the briefest setting is:
      We propose eliminating the income tax and all other sources of federal tax revenues, including payroll taxes (FICA), excise taxes, and import duties, and replacing it with only one tax: a tax on each state in proportion to its population, with each state deciding for itself how to raise its share of the money. … With no other source of revenue to the U.S. government, the balance of power would be forever dramatically reversed back to the states (just as our Founding Fathers envisioned).
He goes on to quote Jefferson in support of a number of points, including the remarkable:
“The true theory of our constitution is that states are independent as to everything within themselves ...” and even went so far as to recognize the right of states to nullify federal laws within their own borders, describing federal intrusion into state matters as “interference by a foreign government”.
In the chapter “Eradicating Capital Gains”, Root, the serial entrepreneur, gets on his soapbox (yeah, I'm cheering him on), about risk and reward, and how “Capital gains are the only ticket out of poverty. Capital gains are the only ticket to success and upward mobility.” He goes on to show what the Left is leading us to:
What do you get when you turn off that {investment} faucet? Cuba. Before Fidel Castro, Cuba was a prosperous country. A huge class of professionals and business owners lived a wonderful life. Then Castro decided that capitalism was bad and socialism was good for the people. Now the country is frozen in time. Homes, cars, roads, government buildings – they are all dilapidated and broken down, frozen in time because without motivation, no one has invested in anything since 1959 (the year of Castro's revolution). … Cuba is the country that time forgot. Liberals whine all day about “fairness”. Life is completely fair in communist and socialist countries. In liberal utopias like that, taxes are so high that everybody lives in poverty and misery.
Since we're on the subject of liberals … here's another great bit (which dovetails back to the damned union deals):
      Why do liberals want to spend ever-higher amounts of your money? So they can buy the votes of people too ignorant to understand that the very policies that they are voting for are keeping them poor, helpless, hopeless, aimless, and clueless.
It's almost like Root was forecasting the whole BLM thuggery that the current administration has encouraged over the past year or two!

Root also has some very interesting suggestions about reforming Congress. It turns out that his home state, Nevada, has a “part time” legislature, which manages to run the state just fine. In the chapter “The Magnificent Seven (Times Two)” he features two 7-item lists. I was hoping to find a source to point you to on these (rather than listing them all out), but one of the highlights of this is to significantly expand the number of representatives by having each Congressperson represent only 100,000 citizens (versus the average of nearly 700,000 each now), making it not only a far more responsive office, but also making campaigns much less expensive. He also suggests, instead of unlimited 2-year terms, making each term for six years, and only allowing two terms. Another feature of this much larger Congress:
Today a lobbyist needs to buy a majority of the 435-member House in order to get the appropriation they desire, or the special favor they are seeking. That's downright cheap. It becomes almost 10 times as expensive for any corporation or lobbyist to accomplish this with a 3,000-member House.
Among the other items Root puts forward here is:
No proposed bill should be enacted into law unless it has been read out loud in its amended form in the presence of a quorum in Congress, and then posted to the Internet at least one week prior to a scheduled vote.
This will not only discourage massive bills with layer upon layer of “hidden” pork, but it would ensure that never again will some cretinous psychopath like Nancy Pelosi be able to pontificate that the public can't see the bill (that's tens of thousands of pages long) until it's passed.

Additionally, there are suggestions for “Presidential line-item veto”, the elimination of “earmarks”, a system to put into effect the First Amendment's “right to petition the government for a redress of grievances”, and a rock-solid constitutional test of any bill … “if a spending bill is not authorized (or enumerated) by our Constitution, the money should not be spent”.

Another section that should get anybody's blood boiling is the “Nanny State” chapter where Root lists case after case of callous elitist politicians destroying “the little people” because they can. He has a great rant in the middle of this that I'm 100% behind:
Never trust government. Never trust politicians or government bureaucrats. Never trust moral crusaders. Never let others define morality for you. Because the people doing the crusading and defining and prosecuting often have an agenda, and out-of-control ego, and an outsized sense of entitlement. They certainly do not have your best interests in mind.
Gotta love that. He follows later with a campaign-like call to action:
It's time to put candidates in office whose goal is to give the power back to the people. Whose goal is limit the size, power, and scope of government. Our wise Founding Fathers wrote about power of the people, by the people, for the people. They did not write about putting power in the hands of morally corrupt, power-hungry, ego-driven, hypocritical politicians and government bureaucrats.
Speaking of the Founding Fathers, he opens one chapter with an awesome quote from George Washington, which should be always remembered: “Government is not reason. It is not eloquence. It is force.” … after all, every “give away” from the government is based on money being forcibly taken (or at least under the threat of force – if you're not Al Sharpton and don't pay your taxes, somebody's eventually going to show up at your door with guns to take you to jail) from somebody else.

Root hits a lot of hot buttons here … “third rail” topics like Education, “affirmative action”, and global cooling warming climate change … and he's right pretty much across the board (although I have issues with his particular favorite cause of on-line poker). He certainly strikes the right chord late in the book with this call for economic sanity:
We cannot possibly continue to spend at the same levels as when things were going good, now that things are going bad. There just isn't enough tax revenue coming in to keep spending at the same baseline. We can't keep spending far more than we take in, while at the same time the national debt from decades past keeps piling up unpaid. We are so broke, we can't pay last year's bills, let alone the new bills from this year.
Frankly, I think that Conscience of a Libertarian is a very important book (which everybody should read), and it's unfortunate that the situations around this (Root returning to the GOP to help in the fight against the continued usurpation of the Executive Branch by enemies of America) have scuttled its primary context. As noted above, I would have loved to see a Root run for the Presidency … it would be “popcorn ready” from start to finish!

I was pleased to see that this appears to still be in print, in both the hardcover and paperback editions, so you could likely get this at your local brick-and-mortar book vendor … and, as much as I'd like to throw some coin Wayne's way, you can get “very good” used copies of the hardcover for as little as a penny (plus the $3.99 shipping) from the new/used guys, so you really don't have much of an excuse for not getting a copy (if nothing else, do remember to grab the .pdf of Ch.13)!


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