September 30th, 2005

Loon

Wake up, take a quiz ...

Another little Quiz ... this time snagged from supedujour's journal. Today's burning question is "What Type of Human Are You?", although, frankly, the quiz didn't have enough sociopathic options to really answer that!

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While it's no surprise that 94% of respondents scored higher as "Do Gooder" than I did, I'm surprised that 97% scored higher on "Drive" ... maybe with more motivation I'd end up being dangerous!


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Loon

We got the quiz in the morning and the meme at night ...

Oh, lookie ... an eye-burning table! At least mine's minimal, given the paucity of interests I list. I snagged this from tausirhasirim's journal, who has some really obscure stuff listed on his chart.

How common are btripp's interests
Universal
none
Popular
none
Common
none
Specialist
libertarian (1469)
Unusual
bureaucrash (16)
tchotchkes (33)
Rare
american_people/link (1)
art*o*mat (4)
cfuu (1)
mold-a-rama (5)
unicity_network (1)

Enter username:

InterestRank was bought to you by _imran_ and MemeLand.org


Gee ... I strike out on "universal", "popular", and "common" interests ... what a shock! Not.


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Hero

When sleaze and stupidy clash on eBay ...

Wow ...

Sometimes I feel like I'm rubbernecking a ugly multi-fatality car crash with body parts strewn across the information superhighway when I run across one of these. First of all, it's a semi-sleazy seller ... they talk about "selling over 8,000 cards" and show a picture with massive piles of cards and close-ups showing some extremely valuable holographics, BUT if one reads the actual auction description, what's for sale are "lots" of 100 to 200 cards (and to their credit, they do have this info bolded and clearly stated) from that massive collection of cards ... this seller is one of the very few I've seen who's made their feedback "private", as I'm sure they regularly get people screaming bloody murder. However, if one had the slightest sense about them, one would read the auction description and know that you were taking a shot at maybe getting some valuable cards by the luck of a draw in a "lot" that was 1/80th to 1/40th of the whole collection.

But eBay is full of idiots, and kiddies and assorted newbies who think they've going to get the deed to the Brooklyn Bridge right after they got off the virtual bus. For a prime example of this, check out the bid history on this one listing:

http://offer.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewBids&item=6213447814

Now, a "reasonable" price to pay for one of these "lots" would be around $3.50 (which, with the rather high shipping, would put your per-card cost ceiling somewhere around 10¢, steep for a bag of commons and uncommons, but not a bad wager if one is betting on some decent holos). Right now there have been 24 bids on this particular "lot", with the price going into the "overpriced" range after about the sixth bid. Of these, two bids were by a user with 19 points (whose high bid was under $3.50), three bids were by a user with 12 points (who maxed out at $5), and one bid (at $7) by a 16-point bidder, these three no doubt actually knew what they were bidding on .... however, fourteen bids were by a user with only 7 feedback points, two bids by a brand-new user with 0 points, and two by a bidder with just 3 points ... these ran up to $15.00 ... to $25.00 ... and to $26.00 and beyond (in that the top two bids are by one bidder who obviously "capped" his bid with a higher bid).

I am sure that the (now) winning bidder is going to be SHOCKED when he gets a bag with 100-200 commons, uncommons, and maybe one or two rares and holos for his $32.50 (bid with shipping). I can hear the wailing and gnashing of teeth already, the howls of protest, the irate letters to eBay.

It makes me feel bad for all involved when I see one of these, as you know that 75% of the bids in question were made in ignorance, perhaps driven by avarice, but largely just plain stupidity. As I say, it's like passing a bad accident, you're bummed, but still have to look.


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